ـTAIZIZ

In Iran, radio came from the time of Qajar and because it worked with Basim, it needed a judicial license. The presence of radio in the world dates back to more than 105 years ago and in Iran to 80 years ago. The world’s first radio program was broadcast in 1906 and the first radio transmitter in Iran was inaugurated on May 25, 1319. Since then, wooden or plastic radio boxes have become an integral part of most Iranians’ lives; At that time to be aware of the corners of the world and today to decorate houses or cafes or even to revive a sense of nostalgia in a generation that has seen the rise and fall of these old radios. In fact, nostalgia, the same pleasurable feeling of being happy and sad at the same time, place, sound, person, music or object in the past, is the main driving force that encourages people to buy old and antique goods, including old radios, and sometimes reviving this Sense will cost a few 10 million.

While today technology has increased so much that you can download all your old radio programs for free from the Google Store
Download for your mobile phone

I do not know exactly what their name was or how much they were. But in their time, these were also expensive radios.
That is, not all families could afford these radios?

  • Not. They could not afford it. I read somewhere. Few people know that at a time before this in old Tehran, if someone wanted to buy and own a radio, he had to get a license from the police, otherwise they would not have been allowed to have a radio, while the radio was for affluent and wealthy families. And
    I do not know exactly. It was very old, these radios were built in 1950, we have even older radios for 1930 and 1940.

Most of these radios were produced in the United States, Sweden, Russia, the Netherlands, France and East Germany

دقیقاً نمی‌دانم چه اسمی داشته و یا چند تومان بوده اند.اما در زمان خودشان هم اینها رادیو‌های گرانی بودند.یعنی همه خانواده‌ها نمی‌توانستند از این رادیو‌ها داشته باشند؟- نه. نمی‌توانستند قدرت خریدش را نداشتند جایی خواندم. شاید کمتر کسی بداند در یک زمان قبل از اینها در طهران قدیم اگر کسی می‌خواست رادیو بخرد و داشته باشد، باید از شهربانی مجوزش را می‌گرفت وگرنه اجازه داشتن رادیو نداشتند، ضمن اینکه رادیو برای خانواده‌های مرفه و پولدار بود. ودقیقئآ نمی‌دانم. خیلی قدیم بوده است، این رادیو‌ها در سال 1950 میلادی ساخته شده‌اند، حتی از این قدیمی تر برای 1930 و 1940 هم رادیو داریم.
– اغلب این رادیوها محصول کشور آمریکا، سوئد ،روسیه ،هلند، فرانسه و آلمان شرقی بودند-تقریباً 40 نوح مختلف رادیو آمده بود و
– مدلهای مختلف دارشت «تلفن کن»، «فرگوسن»، «گروندیک»،راديو گروند وووو خیلی زیاد بود این عکس سال 1950 بودhttps://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.sheypoor.com/%25D8%25B1%25D8%25A7%25D8%25AF%25DB%258C%25D9%2588_%25D9%2582%25D8%25AF%25DB%258C%25D9%2585%25DB%258C&ved=2ahUKEwi3p_-W4-PsAhWjhOAKHRtXBmwQFjANegQIBBAB&usg=AOvVaw2JRMeGxtegHLcSIdutsM3G

2 thoughts on “ـTAIZIZ

  1. I do not know exactly what their name was or how much they were. But in their time, these were also expensive radios.
    That is, not all families could afford these radios?
    – Not. They could not afford it. I read somewhere. Few people know that at a time before this in old Tehran, if someone wanted to buy and own a radio, he had to get a license from the police, otherwise they would not have been allowed to have a radio, while the radio was for affluent and wealthy families. And
    I do not know exactly. It was very old, these radios were built in 1950, we have even older radios for 1930 and 1940.

    Most of these radios were produced in the United States, Sweden, Russia, the Netherlands, France and East Germany
    – About 40 different Noahs came to the radio and

    – There were many different models of “Call”, “Ferguson”, “Grundick”, Radio Grund Vuvu
    This photo was taken in 1950
    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.sheypoor.com/%25D8%25B1%25D8%25A7%25D8%25AF%25DB%258C%25D9%2588_ % 25D9% 2582% 25D8% 25AF% 25DB% 258C% 25D9% 2585% 25DB% 258C & ved = 2ahUKEwi3p_-W4-PsAhWjhOAKHRtXBmwQFjANegQIBBAB & usg = AOvVaw2JRLecxteg

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